month DataTjej: Fanny Andersson

Fanny Andersson, of the month DataTjej February 2021

In English below

Nominated by Lovisa Åsgården: “Fanny is an amazing person and inspiration! Today she works as a Stream lead and frontend / web developer at Polestar in Gothenburg. In 2019, she was the only female developer to start at Polestar via Sigma's Young Talent program. Since then, she has been strongly committed to attracting and retaining women and non-binaries in the IT industry by the following year, now in 2020, getting involved with Sigma and Polestar and ensuring that it was the other way around - where all but one were included in new litter Young Talent was female or non-binary. There we talk big change in a short time and where she showed a lot of talk AND workshop! Fanny is also very humble and it is clear that she cares very much about the people around her, both at and outside of work. ”

Name: Fanny Andersson
Age: 32
Workplace: Polestar
Training: Systems science at the University of Gothenburg (called Systems science: IT, people, & organization).

Tips for girls who want to study IT and technology-related subjects:
Go to digital events first to get a little more information about what there is for different IT programs. And also think about whether it is programming that suits you. For example, Pink Programming or Tjejer Kodar run good events where they go through certain programming languages ​​or what it is like to work as a developer, etc. They also provide different code challenges. But above all, my biggest tip is to dare to test yourself.

In what way did you get involved in the issue of trying to get more women and non-binaries into the talent program ?:
I think that question has been with me for quite some time. Based on how you have seen how it has been at other companies. How they distribute women / non-binary vs men and it has been very similar in every company I have been to. And I have often been the person who asked the difficult question of how they actually work with gender equality in practice. I think many companies think they work with gender equality but they can not demonstrate how they do it. For me, it eventually became a statement to show that women / non-binary exist. Companies only need a push that shows that they are actively working for gender equality, because most people want to end up in places where they see that companies are working on these issues.

What made you take that initiative ?:
I had a good mentor who saw that I was passionate about more than just sitting and coding and because I also questioned why they only hired a girl who happened to be me. And it turned out that there were only guys during the entire recruitment process. So I thought about how Sigma young talents and Polestar tried to get women / non-binary and why I was the only one who applied. So I had meetings with HR and then with my boss at Polestar and discussed this. Then I involved other people who I knew were passionate about these issues and who had a wider network of contacts. So the first seed was put well then. When I was told that there would be a new batch of Sigma young talents, I was asked to be part of the recruitment and to hold the interviews. This resulted in us hiring 7 women / non-binary and one man. I feel very proud that I was given the confidence to put that seed and contribute to change.

Do you have any tips for employers who want to change the way they recruit ?: The first tip is to start by actively working on it, so that it gradually becomes a change. If you do not actively start working on it, there will definitely be no real change in it. We do not want the same structure that IT is characterized by today. Then start collaborating, or involving associations that can help companies start working more equally. But of course it's not just about what employers should think about, the biggest responsibility unfortunately lies in our education and how it is shaped to attract younger people to technology. That more girls / non-binaries are starting to believe in themselves and looking for IT companies as they get older.

Can you tell us how you ended up at your workplace and what your tasks are for
something?:
It all started with the fact that I had previous contact with a recruiter from Sigma and had heard that they were doing something called Sigma young talents, similar to trainee programs you could say, which I thought sounded super interesting. I was told that you had to take technical courses and get a mentor while you worked. And heard about Polestar from Sigma which was one of the companies they ran YT (young talents). To be completely honest, at first I did not know what Polestar was then. First thought it was Pole dancing, there is a place in Gothenburg called Polestar where you do pole dancing. But it turned out that it was about the new car Polestar, which will be fully electric and is owned 50% by Volvo and 50% by Geely. I had my prejudices before my first interview but was shocked and surprised that the boss who interviewed me was young and he seemed to have good opinions. I have always had a prejudice that only tired older men work at car companies, but I was wrong. I then got the job as a developer and started my 1-year program on Sigma young talents. My first tasks were to code and mainly in the frontend which I had never done before. Sit in new programming languages ​​that I was not used to either. Started sitting with Typescript, React, Graphql & node. It was scary but challenging which suited me like a glove. Today after my Sigma young talent year I now sit as stream lead (team lead) where I take care of 4 people who go their Sigma young talent year. Unfortunately, I do not code as much as I did before, but I try to find a balance in my leadership and coding. I make sure to support them in their journey and give them feedback so that they can develop and do what they are passionate about. I am very motivated and happy to do what I do today.

What made you choose a profession in IT ?: It was not entirely obvious actually. I was tired of driving a tram in Gothenburg, and I moved to Gothenburg to actually study. What was thought then was to become a physiotherapist, but I saw that the University of Gothenburg had something called systems science that I thought sounded exciting. I have always had a great technical interest since I was little. But have probably never dared to think and believe that this was where I would end up or that I could become good at it. And I had not programmed before, or what I had done before was to fix with Myspace page with HTML. I entered the physiotherapist program, but chose to change my search and put systems science only when there was something in me that said I wanted to test. So there it all started and I had time to work at another company before I ended up at Polestar. I feel I'm in the right place and I like what I do. It feels like an important sentence.

Your three best tips for someone going to a job interview ?: Be yourself, ask questions that you think are important to you to the employer, and think that you are there because they are interested in you. (And if it does not become the job, then maybe it was not right, there will be more chances).

In English

Nominated by Lovisa Åsgården: “Fanny is a fantastic person and inspiration! Today she works as a Stream lead and frontend / web developer at Polestar in Gothenburg. In 2019 she was the only female developer who started at Polestar via Sigma's Young Talent program. She was strongly committed to attracting and retaining women and non-binaries in the IT industry by the following year, now in 2020, getting involved with Sigma and Polestar and ensuring that it was the other way around - where all but one who were admitted to the new batch Young Talent was female or non-binary. That's a big change in a short time and she showed that it's not just all talk! Fanny is also very humble and it is clear that she cares very much about the people around her, both at and outside of work. ”

Name: Fanny Andersson
Age: 32
Workplace: Polestar
Education: Systems Science at the University of Gothenburg (called Systems Science: IT, people, & organization).

Tips for people who want to study IT-related topics ?: Sign up for digital events first to get a little more information about all the different IT programs available. And also think about whether it is programming that suits you or something else. For example, Pink Programming and Tjejer kodar hosts good events where they go through certain programming languages ​​or what it is like to work as, for example, developers, etc. They also provide different code challenges. But above all, my biggest tip is to dare to test yourself.

How did you get involved in the issue of trying to get more women and non-binaries into the talent program ?: I think the issue has been with me for quite some time. Based on how you have seen how it has been at other companies. How many distributes women / non-binary vs men and it has been very similar in every company I have been to earlier. And I have often been the person who asked the difficult question of how they actually work with gender equality in practice. I think many companies think they work with gender equality but they can not demonstrate how they do it. For me, it eventually became a statement to show that women / non-binary exists. Companies only need a push to show that they are actively working for gender equality, because most people want to end up in places where they see that companies are working on these issues.

What made you take that initiative ?: I had a good mentor who saw that I was passionate about more than just sitting and coding, and because I also questioned why they only hired one girl who happened to be me. And it turned out that there were only guys during the entire recruitment process. So I thought about how Sigma young talents and Polestar tried to get women / non-binary and why I was the only one who applied. So I had meetings with HR and also with my boss at Polestar to discuss this. Then I involved other people who I knew were passionate about these issues and who had a wider network of contacts. So the first seed was put well then. When I was told that there would be a new batch of Sigma young talents, I was asked to be part of the recruitment and to hold the interviews. This resulted in us hiring 7 women / non-binary and one man. I feel very proud that I was given the confidence to put that seed and contribute to change.

Do you have any tips for employers who want to change the way they recruit ?: The first tip is to start by actively working on it, so that it gradually becomes a change. If you do not actively start working on it, there will definitely be no real change in it. We do not want the same structure that IT is characterized by today. Then start collaborating, or involving associations that can help companies start working more equally. But of course it's not just about what employers should think about, the biggest responsibility unfortunately lies in our education and how it is shaped to attract younger people to technology. That more girls / non-binaries are starting to believe in themselves and are looking for IT companies as they get older.

Can you tell us how you ended up at your workplace and what your duties are for
something ?:
It all started with me having previous contact with a recruiter from Sigma and had heard that they were doing something called Sigma young talents, similar trainee programs you could say, which I thought sounded super interesting. I was told that you had to take technical courses and get a mentor while you worked. I heard about Polestar from Sigma which was one of the companies who ran YT (young talents). To be completely honest, at first I did not know what Polestar was. First thought it was pole dancing, because there is a place in Gothenburg called Polestar where you do pole dancing. But it turned out that it was about the new car Polestar, which will be fully electric and is owned 50% by Volvo and 50% by Geely. I had my prejudices before my first interview but was shocked and surprised that the boss who interviewed me was young and he seemed to have good opinions. I have always had a prejudice that only dull older men work at car companies, but I was wrong. I then got the job as a developer and started my 1-year program on Sigma young talents. My first tasks were to code and mainly in the frontend which I had never done before. I learned new programming languages ​​that I was not used to either. Started sitting with Typescript, React, Graphql & node. It was scary but challenging which suited me like a glove. Today after my Sigma young talent year I now sit as stream lead (team lead) where I take care of 4 people who attend the Sigma young talent year. Unfortunately, I do not code as much as I did before, but I try to find a balance in my leadership and coding. I make sure to support them in their journey and give them feedback so that they can develop and do what they are passionate about. I am very motivated and happy to do what I do today.

What made you choose a profession in IT ?: It was not completely obvious actually. I was tired of driving trams in Gothenburg, and I moved to Gothenburg to actually study. What was thought then was to become a physiotherapist, but I saw that the University of Gothenburg had something called systems science that I thought sounded exciting. I have always had a great technical interest since I was little. But have probably never dared to think and believe that this was where I would end up or that I could become good at it. And I had not programmed before, or what I had done before was to fix Myspace pages with HTML. I entered the physiotherapist program, but chose to change my search and put systems science only when there was something in me that said I wanted to test. So there it all started and I had time to work at another company before I ended up at Polestar. I feel like I'm in the right place and I like what I do. It feels like an important purpose.

Your three best tips for someone going to a job interview ?: Be yourself, ask questions that you think are important to you to the employer, and think that you are there because they are interested in you. (And if you do not land the job, then maybe it was not right, there will be more chances).

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